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15" Pasi Portal Gong


by Andrew Borakove October 13, 2017

A pleasant side-effect of the continuing proliferation of gongs is the release of harmonics and sub-harmonics, glistening tones and rumbling undertones into the hidden strata of our metaphysical surroundings.

Every time a gong is played another portal is opened into an unexplored realm, another mystery is born.



There is a reason gongs share a shape with manhole covers, to release the energy of a gong is to lift the manhole cover of our physical plane of existence and glimpse what lies beneath.

That is, if what lies beneath could also occasionally also be hovering above, and if what lies beneath were populated by shadows in every color of the spectrum, abstracted auras and scores of forgotten mythologies.

Verily!, a panoply of mysteries exists inside every gong.

And sometimes the mysteries of a gong remain firmly grounded in the arena of linguistics. For example, the 15" Pasi gong on High C stand. The 15" part is easy enough to understand and merely glancing at the shape of the High C stand provides the context to comprehend the title. But there is that lingering "Pasi"- a word that presents many possibilities when it comes to pronunciation.

It could pronounced as if referring to a group of men on horseback on the trail of a wanted outlaw - a.k.a a posse



Or in a slightly updated version, it could be pronounced in the way you refer to the group of folks with whom you go out and celebrate - a.k.a. yer posse!


There is also the potential it could be pronounced "Pacey," as in a "pacey-car" at a racey-track.

Or- as in the first name of this fictional teenager below who inhabited a fictional hometown named for a fictional creek owned by someone whose name was Dawson. (Not Richard.)



Finally, there is the potential for it to be pronounced as if it were stage directions from an old-fashioned melodrama

*********

Act I

Son scrapes the manure off his boots and enters.

SON. Pa- I am tired of life on this here farm- I am gonna travel to the city to seek my fortune and cavort with dancin' gals and when I can't find them, dancin' guys -

PA. (sigh)

End of Act I

*********

The 15" Pasi gong on a High C stand is a great way to begin your journey. The 15" Pasi is a celebratory gong perfect for ringing in your bon voyage.

The 15" Pasi gong announces your first steps into the swirling hall of mysteries with a clear, somewhat deep tone that sparkles and shimmers, ushering you across the threshold like a steady dance partner and guiding you with a sure hand on your ear.

Celebrate uncertainty!

Send a joyful noise into the possible with a 15" Pasi Gong on a Hi C stand from Gongs Unlimited.

Written by Robert Stewart in his time at Gongs Unlimited.




Andrew Borakove
Andrew Borakove

Author




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